Blog Articles 126–130

Lessig Blog, v2: Prosecutor as bully

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lessig:

But all this shows is that if the government proved its case, some punishment was appropriate. So what was that appropriate punishment? Was Aaron a terrorist? Or a cracker trying to profit from stolen goods? Or was this something completely different?

Early on, and to its great credit, JSTOR figured “appropriate” out: They declined to pursue their own action against Aaron, and they asked the government to drop its. MIT, to its great shame, was not as clear, and so the prosecutor had the excuse he needed to continue his war against the “criminal” who we who loved him knew as Aaron.

Here is where we need a better sense of justice, and shame. For the outrageousness in this story is not just Aaron. It is also the absurdity of the prosecutor’s behavior. From the beginning, the government worked as hard as it could to characterize what Aaron did in the most extreme and absurd way. The “property” Aaron had “stolen,” we were told, was worth “millions of dollars” — with the hint, and then the suggestion, that his aim must have been to profit from his crime. But anyone who says that there is money to be made in a stash of ACADEMIC ARTICLES is either an idiot or a liar. It was clear what this was not, yet our government continued to push as if it had caught the 9/11 terrorists red-handed.

We need to ask these questions of much of our justice system. Disporportionality of justice (or at least the surrounding situation) seems to be a contributing factor in Swartz’s suicide; how many others are dead, or locked up with their families in tatters, because the U.S. culture of justice (both in official agencies and society at large) has forsaken balance?

argparse4s 0.2.1

I pushed a new release of argparse4s today. It should reach Maven Central shortly.

Not much new:

  • Update argparse4j dependency version
  • Add support for Scala 2.10.0
  • Move to GitHub

Have fun!